Monday, June 2, 2008

An old forest


Last week, I took the daughter back to Michigan for her summer job. On the way there, the newly graduated Natural Resource and Environmental Science Major, wanted to stop and see this forest. It is the oldest growth forest in lower Michigan. So, we stopped and saw some wonderful old trees.

12 comments:

  1. Does that mean the trees are old, or not cleared out at all? Never heard of old growth forest.

    ReplyDelete
  2. According to the recent grad, it is old trees that have never been cleared. She mentioned it looked like it needed a good burn! I will show some trees tomorrow.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have heard a good burn is needed at times for the long-term health of a forest. It's so fascinating.

    Neva, you commented that you were going to read Simple Genius. Have you read books 1 and 2 in the King and Maxwell series? They are Split Second and Hour Game. I have read that series yet but it's next after I read Last Man Standing. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Nice she is excited about her past studies and future career and is following her passion by stopping to visit this forest.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That's very cool. An old growth forest. Marcel had a post about forests recently, I'll bet daughter would like to visit his blog. She sounds like a no nonsense blunt kinda chip off the old block, lol!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. how old is this forest?
    are they all around 500 years old by now?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hope all works out well for her - she has "her head screwed on the right way" as my Dad would say!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. cela devait être une belle promenade et une belle découverte.


    this should be a beautiful promenade and a beautiful discovery.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Neva, here's a link to Baldacci's site and list of novels. Baldacci website -- there are certain books that you might want to read in the series order. And then there are some books that are stand alone. :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. It is nice to see that these forests have been preserved.
    Our indigenous forests in the Southern Cape were severely plundered during the 18th and 19th centuries and only a handful of the giant yellow woods remain. It is sad walking through the areas of new growth and coming across the bases of the old trees - they were massive

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love the old growth forest. We are getting ready to go after work tomorrow to camp again.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Congratulations to your recent grad. What a nice degree to have.

    ReplyDelete

I am glad you stopped in!