Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Blenko Stained Glass


I was over visiting at Greenville Daily Photo and Denton's post reminded me of the lovely Blenko stained glass display....I love stained glass and am amazed it has been around for such a long time!

12 comments:

  1. cette exposition de vitraux est magnifique. j'adore.
    this exhibition is magnificent stained glass. Very good.

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  2. Oooh! "Louis" likes stained glass, too!
    Have you seen this gem?

    Re your comment about the tanker. It is difficult to see - the sun in the mist on the Bay that morning made the background seem like it was smogged in. (It really wasn't.) The tanker is right center in front of Angel Island.

    Here's the polar opposite to Chuck Pefley's Vespas.

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  3. Popping in during my monthly tour of the blogs to say HI again.

    Awesome stained glass windows.

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  4. I love looking at stained glass windows. The Church I went to growing up had stained glass but it was pretty bland.

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  5. Indeed it was amazing that the windows in la Sainte-Chapelle were not destroyed in World War II. In fact, it is a wonder the chapel itself was not destroyed. The windows had been removed, packed in straw and hidden from the Nazis, as had the windows of the cathedral at Chartres. During the liberation of Paris, some of the heaviest fighting was right across the street, literally, at the Prefecture of Police. The Resistance had effectively taken over the police and the Nazis made a determined effort to take the building: Panzers on the plaza! Equally endangered due to its location was Nôtre-Dame! Not only that, but Hitler had ordered Paris destroyed.

    Now here's some trivia you may wish you hadn't learned. In the middle ages, pigeons were much more commonly cultivated for food than were chickens. In many of the old farms in France, you can still find pigeon roosts. Then they figured out that a steady diet of pigeon led to kidney failure. Voila! Prisoners were given pigeon to eat. The onset of kidney failure was marked by intensely yellow urine. This was collected and sold to the glassmakers for the yellow die used in the stained glass windows....

    (Editor to "Louis": 'After that, you may leave now, "Louis".)

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  6. Great post and great info about the yellowing of the glass.

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  7. You wouldn't believe some of the techniques that have been used since the 1300s to obtain color and detail on figures in glass windows.

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  8. I love stained glass too (but who doesn't love stain glass?)

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  9. That is beautiful stained glass. I love it too. My mother did quite a bit for a few years. She just gave it up recently---said her eyes were not what they used to be. She is 92. Go figure. MB

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  10. Stained glass is beautiful. We have it in our church windows.

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I am glad you stopped in!